Transgender History

English model April Ashley is credited as the first successful transgender model. She was born in Liverpool, England in 1935 and underwent sex reassignment surgery at age 25, making her one of the first Brits to have the procedure.

After moving to London, she began booking gigs left and right with notable photographers. She also did runway and editorial work, appearing in high-profile magazines. After being outed by tabloids in 1961, her career was cut short. She has since been honored in an exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool and released an autobiography.

Out and Proud!

On August 2nd, New Zealand’s “Laurel Hubbard” will become the first out transgender athlete to participate in an Olympics. However, being able to compete has not come without it’s challenges. 

The International Olympic Committee’s medical chief has praised New Zealand transgender athlete Laurel Hubbard’s bravery as a trailblazing athlete at the Tokyo Olympics.

Hubbard will become the first transgender athlete to compete at an Olympics when she starts in the heavyweight 87+kg category on Monday, a milestone Richard Budgett says is scientifically and morally justified.

Hubbard’s participation has been a controversial topic. Australia’s weightlifting federation tried to block Hubbard from competing at the 2018 Commonwealth Games, a ploy that was rejected by organizers, while British television personality Piers Morgan said her selection and approval was a “disaster for women’s sport”.

As you can imagine, there is much more. 

Let’s be Careful Out There

This is actually a continuation of a post I wrote a couple days ago concerning losing one of our main male privileges’ when we transition to a feminine life. The privilege is personal security. It’s more or less a natural transition since so many cis women know of and have lived around male harassment their entire lives. 

Following the post, I received a couple of comments. The first is from Connie:

“You’re absolutely correct. We should never (short) skirt the issue of security. I’ve had my share of dicey moments, too. Fortunately, for both of us, we may have learned the hard way….but not the costly way. The closest to getting hurt I had was being sucker punched by a creep while I was stepping in to help some younger girls he was stalking late one night. I’ve reached the age where I’m not out late at night much; bedtime is 10:00 pm, usually. I also have slowed down, physically, so my confidence in being able to outrun an assailant has dropped considerably. I used to be a fast woman, but not a “fast” woman. Not that creepy men care what kind of woman I am, because they are just…uh…CREEPS. Watch out for them!”

Thanks for your unique perspective on a difficult problem.

The second comes from “Girlyboy”:

“Part of my own desire to transition is the desire to have the weakness you describe. Part of me wonders if that weakness that comes with a feminine body is not part of why society seems to hate trans MTF so much–that you would willingly give up power and physical strength must seem ludicrous to some…for me, feeling vulnerable is part of the goal.” 

Interesting comment. I think very early in my Mtf gender transition, I think I felt the same way because feeling vulnerable validated my femininity.  As I grew into my stronger transgender self, the potential violence all women are subjected to became more important to me and I began to be much more careful.