Brave…or Smart?

 Recently GB responded to a post I wrote concerning coming out as “bravery” Which in turn came from an Anna comment. Confused yet? Don’t be, here is the comment:

Unsplash image: Sharon 
McCutcheon

“Yes, I understand completely. How can it be bravery when we have no choice? And yet, coming from a typical social perspective, what we do as trans people is nothing but heroic, and yes, it is brave. Talk about strength. Trans people are the strongest people I know. When your core foundational identity is rocked as it is for all trans people, and you still manage to survive, sometimes thrive, it is a beautiful miracle.

And regarding your thoughts on giving up male privilege, I think there is a lot to explore here. I was with one of my longest female friends recently and we talked about white male privilege and what it meant to give that up as a trans person…and I have been wondering about this a lot as I meet people from different ages, races, creeds and seeing how they react to me…and what I am finding is that people who are oppressed are more encouraging to me on this journey than other white men..”

Thank you for the comment and I did neglect mentioning white privilege in the post. Indeed it is a huge part of what I was trying to write about. On the other hand, I don’t feel I am qualified to write about pressing racial issues because I did grow up and later lived with my white privilege. 

I did enjoy your comment which said “When your core foundational identity is rocked as it is for all transgender people, and you still survive, sometimes thrive, it is a beautiful miracle.” The only idea I could add is we transgender people are able to finally thrive is because we are finally able to live as our authentic selves. 

Giving up our white male privilege is but a small price to pay to be able to achieve a gender transformation. There are those who argue there are female privileges’ also and I think the future is female but in the meantime there are still too many male privileges’ such as personal security to consider. In fact, you could be the brave one if you don’t consider your surroundings when you begin to explore the feminine world for the first time. Just take the time to research the number of transgender violent assaults and use the numbers to be more careful.

Cis women have the benefit of growing up with the knowledge of not having personal security and learning to the best of their ability to deal with it. I have my own personal experiences of being in the wrong place at the wrong time when I was first entering the feminine world. I will share them at another time but to make a long story short, I escaped with no violence and I learned. 

Finally, I believe many white men are feeling the potential loss of their shallow male privileges and are more likely to be less into supporting other transgender women who have “joined the other other gender team.” Plus men are likely to have a more fragile idea of their sexuality and aren’t brave enough to experiment with change. 

I know I have covered quite a bit of ground with this post but bottom line is don’t confuse bravery with ignorance. Be careful, learn your lessons and build a new life.    

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